2018 All In National Meeting Agenda (full)

The links below will take you to session pages and resources. You will need to be a logged-in member of the online community in order to access some of the links.

Tuesday, September 11, 2018

2nd Floor Registration Area Upon registering, you’ll receive a bag with the meeting materials and your ticket to the Deep Dive Workshop you registered for.  We ask that you attend the workshop for which you registered unless you have “swapped seats” with a colleague.  Your ticket is in your bag of meeting materials.

Please note: Public Health National Center for Innovations (PHNCI) guests will meet for a closed session in Cambridge during this time

2nd Floor Registration Area – Please take a quick break to refresh with a box lunch before diving in to the Standing Plenary.

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Capitol Ballroom
Building a Movement Together for Equity

Welcome to the second All In National Meeting! In this opening movement plenary session, Dr. Soma Stout will quickly reflect on the current state of the field for multi-sector collaboration and the larger movement for health equity, highlight the Pathways to Population Health framework and tools about the journey to population health and equity, and invite us to engage in smaller conversations about how we might advance equity together. There will be chairs available and we encourage you to stand and move as you are able.

Dr. Soma Stout, Vice President, Institute for Healthcare Improvement and Executive Lead, 100 Million Healthier Lives

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Planning
Getting Started
In the Thick of It 
Looking Forward

Trauma and Violent Injury Prevention – Capitol 1
Using Data to Reduce Community Violence and Injury and Provide Trauma-Informed Care
Given the difficulty of accessing relevant trauma-related data, hospitals often struggle to provide trauma-informed care to vulnerable populations. Simultaneously, there is also a lack of accurate and complete information about violent injuries, which is critical for communities making decisions about allocating limited violence prevention resources.  Learn how two hospitals are using data sharing with mental health, intimate partner violence services, legal and immigration advocacy services, and law enforcement to provide trauma-informed care and reduce violence and injury in their communities.
In the Thick of It Janina Morrison, The Wellness Center at Historic General Hospital
Looking Forward Jasmine Moore, Grady Memorial Hospital

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Equity and Community Data Collection – Capitol 2
Tapping into Community Members as Data Resources to Engage Partners in Addressing Equity
With the growing drive to access and share community data, it is vital that communities keep in mind inequities that can exist in the data and make conscious efforts to ensure community data reflects the needs of traditionally underrepresented populations. Learn how two communities are using microsurveys, in-depth focus groups, and social media polls to gather community-identified priorities across sectors with the leadership of multi-stakeholder advisory groups to guide local efforts.
Getting Started Wivine Ngongo, Center for African American Health
Planning Vaishnavi Hariprasad and Namrita Singh, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment

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Housing and Community Development – Capitol 3
Improving Health Through Non-Traditional Leaders: Community Development and Housing
Learn how leaders in housing and community development are working to improve the health of their residents. This includes understanding how well communities are being served across the social determinants of health through conducting community assessments, building collaborative partnerships, and educating and engaging residents to develop interventions and address health inequities.
Planning Jennifer King and Amber Jones, Old Brooklyn Community Development Corporation
In the Thick of It Manuel Castañeda, New Brunswick Tomorrow; Camilla Comer-Carruthers, Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital-New Brunswick

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State and Local Government – Capitol 4
Data Sharing and Use in State and Local Government
State and local governments are building their capacity to collect, share, and use data more effectively through common data platforms, interagency data sharing, public-private partnerships, and development of open tools. In this session, the speakers will share how their teams are approaching data collection and partnerships around data sharing to answer priority questions around costs incurred, access to services, gaps in care, and the availability of resources. In turn, this will guide efforts to improve government programs and distribute public funds more strategically.
In the Thick of It Carrie Paykoc, Colorado Office of eHealth Innovation; Whitney LeBoeuf, Colorado Evaluation and Action Lab
In the Thick of It Julia Koschinsky, University of Chicago Center for Spatial Data Science; Nicole Marwell, University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration

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Data Aggregation for Asthma – Tabor
Building Technical Platforms to Aggregate Data and Tackle Asthma
Hear from two communities that are building platforms to share and link clinical information with other social determinants of health data from their partners. Though the technology may differ — a technical platform that manages data from multiple sources using Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) versus a multi-sector connected data warehouse that exports information to a modeling platform — both communities are focused on democratizing data to better understand the non-clinical factors that influence the health of their residents, and engaging stakeholders in using these infrastructures to make their data actionable and expand their use cases.
In the Thick of It Anjum Khurshid, Dell Medical School, University of Texas at Austin
Looking Forward Karen Hacker, Allegheny County Health Department

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Referral Tools for Care Coordination – Executive Lounge
Breaking Down Silos Within Referral Networks
People in need rarely need just one kind of help to stay healthy and navigating the complex landscape of services is difficult. This has led to the development of many tools, platforms, and software systems to help patients and providers manage referrals, but these solutions can in and of themselves create their own data and resource silos.  Learn how networks are partnering with others or evolving interoperable platforms in order to maximize connection points, reduce data silos, improve care coordination, and achieve better outcomes for their clients.
Planning Greg Bloom, Open Referral
In the Thick of It Taylor Justice, Unite Us

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Join one of the following roundtable discussions to explore issues and solutions with others in an informal, small group conversation facilitated by a leader with content expertise.  For more detailed descriptions, click here.

Tabor
Health and HMIS Data • Allison Kenty and Katie Sendze, HealthInfoNet – Table 1
Health Equity and Civic Engagement • Jacques Colon, Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department Table 2
Moving from Programs to Policy • Alane McCahey, Gateway Family YMCA/Shaping Elizabeth Table 3
Communicating Data with California ACHs • Andy Krackov, Velir Table 4

Cambridge
Care Coordination for Veterans and Their Families • Gilly Cantor and Jim McDonough, Institute for Veterans and Military Families Table 5
Strategic Communication • Rebecca Lindberg, Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation Table 6
Resident Engagement • Lesly Feaux, Boulder County Public Health Table 7

Executive Lounge
Data Visualization / Neighborhood Listening Sessions • Victor Okwo, Sedgwick County Division of Health Table 8
Screening and Referral for Non-English, Non-Spanish Speaking Children • Eileen Auer Bennett, Assuring Better Child Health & DevelopmentKristine Rodrigues, Denver Health and Hospital Authority Table 9
CHORDS Network Strategies • Catherine Horle, Colorado Regional Health Information Organization (CORHIO); Sara Schmitt, Colorado Health InstituteTable 10
Assessment for Advancing Community Transformation Tool • Kate Konkle and Janna West-Kowalski, County Health Rankings & Roadmaps  – Table 11

Millennium Ballroom
Supporting Coalitions to Advance Policy Change •
Jaime Dircksen, Trinity Health – Table 12
Social Network Analysis •
Paige Backlund Jarquin, Colorado Health Institute; Kyla Hoskins, Trailhead Institute – Table 13
Co-Creation of Linked Tools and Processes •
Laura Gustin, United Way of Greater Rochester – Table 14
PARTNER Tool • Stephanie Bultema and Danielle Varda, Visible Network Labs – Table 15
Partner Engagement 
Stacey Lea Flanagan, City of Jersey City – Table 16
Data Sharing with Mental Health 
Stella Gukasyan, Elevation Health Partners; Leslie Dishman, Integrated Behavioral Health Partners – Table 17
Results-Based Accountability Framework Emma Olson, North Carolina Center for Health and Wellness – Table 18

Reducing Tobacco Use Through Data Sharing • Elizabeth Bishop and Mary Singler, Northern Kentucky Health Department – Table 19
Coordinating Food Pantries • Kim Blanda, Hunterdon Partnership for Health
 – Table 20
Evidence for Action Technical Assistance and Funding Opportunities • May Lynn Tan, Evidence for Action – Table21
DASH Knowledgebase 
Melissa Moorehead and Stephanie Johnson, DASH, Michigan Public Health Institute – Table 22

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Capitol Ballroom
Engaging Payers in Addressing Social Determinants of Health

This panel will discuss how and why private payers address the social determinants of health for their members and how data plays a role in implementing and monitoring the success of those efforts.

• Erica Coe, Partner, Co-Leader of Center for US Health System Reform, McKinsey and Company
• Sherry Husa, CEO, Managed Health Services
• Merrill Friedman, Sr. Director of Disability Policy, Anthem

 

Millennium  Ballroom

Join old friends and make new ones as you enjoy conversation and light refreshments.

Wednesday, September 12, 2018

2nd Floor Registration Area

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Capitol Ballroom
Welcome back to day two of the All In National Meeting. We’ll recap day one and get ready for the day ahead.

3 – Day 2 Opening – Welcome Back Excercise and Check In from AllInData4Health on Vimeo.

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Capitol Ballroom
Who Needs Health Equity? The Urgency to Build Public Will to Advance Our Work

Over the last 20 years, we’ve seen an explosion in the availability of data that provide strong evidence about the types of programs, policies, and initiatives that result in improved population health outcomes. Our data are helping us to prove that it is possible to make investments in population health that are cost-effective, improve health outcomes, and engage communities as co-producers of their own health—and that many of these investments have residual impacts that go well beyond improved health outcomes for the targeted beneficiaries. But access to more data and empirical evidence has not been the game-changer that many of us thought it would be. It can be tough to make a compelling case for systems changes that would make meaningful improvements in health outcomes. Worse, when we are not careful in how we use the data we have, our attempts to build support can actually backfire and reduce support for our work. This session will help participants understand how to use data to build public support for scaling health programs, policies and investments that fundamentally transform our health ecosystems for the better.

Dr. Tiffany Manuel, Vice President, Knowledge, Impact & Strategy, Enterprise Community Partners, Inc.

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Planning
Getting Started
In the Thick of It
Looking Forward

Partnership with Human Services – Capitol 1
Accessing Human Services Information to Map Resources and Improve Care Coordination
Given the difficulty of accessing relevant trauma-related data, hospitals often struggle to provide trauma-informed care to vulnerable populations. Simultaneously, there is also a lack of accurate and complete information about violent injuries, which is critical for communities making decisions about allocating limited violence prevention resources.  Learn how two hospitals are using data sharing with mental health, intimate partner violence services, legal and immigration advocacy services, and law enforcement to provide trauma-informed care and reduce violence and injury in their communities.
In the Thick of It  Sandra Serna, Louisiana Public Health Institute; LaVondra Hallman Dobbs, VIA LINK
In the Thick of It John Green, Boulder County Housing and Human Services; Paul Marola, Colorado Regional Health Information Organization (CORHIO)

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Developing Legal Use Cases – Capitol 2
Developing Use Cases to Tackle Legal Barriers and Make the Value Case for Data Sharing
When approaching multi-sector data sharing partnerships, particularly for potentially sensitive data linked to at-risk, vulnerable populations or students, it can be extremely useful to develop shared use cases that allow all stakeholders to understand what kinds of data will be necessary across multiple systems. Hear examples from two communities who have been able to successfully build their use cases and make the legal rationale in order to demonstrate value and build the data sharing relationships that they need.
Getting Started  Waldo Mikels-Carrasco, Michiana Health Information Network
In the Thick of It Kevin Konty, NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

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Developing Shared Metrics – Capitol 3
Using a Common Scoreboard: Developing Shared Metrics to Measure Multi-Sector Work
In working with multiple partners across a wide spectrum of sectors, it is important to develop a shared understanding of your collaboration’s goals and find ways to measure progress towards achieving the desired outcomes. This can be particularly difficult when it comes to measuring a wide variety of social needs and influences. In this session, speakers will share their processes for creating shared language and understanding and developing a common set of metrics to use with all community partners.
In the Thick of It Denise Rodgers, Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences
In the Thick of It Karis Grounds and William York, 2-1-1 San Diego / Community Information Exchange

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Housing and Public Health – Capitol 4
Partnering with Affordable Housing to Address the Social Determinants of Health

As an essential component of the social determinants of health, housing organizations are taking the lead in partnering with public health and health systems in order to better understand the impacts of affordable housing and how best to support community members. Speakers will share engagement strategies and tips for community capacity building that can be implemented to address built environment barriers, as well as the governance structures and data sharing tools that have been critical elements for building cross-sector analytic capacities for linking housing and health data.

In the Thick of It  Jodi Cunningham and Jennifer Foster, The Community Builders; Denisha Porter, City of Cincinnati Health Department
In the Thick of It  Sarah Oppenheimer, King County Housing Authority; Alastair Matheson, Public Health-Seattle & King County; Andria Lazaga, Seattle Housing Authority

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Jail Data for Community Health – Tabor
Releasing Jail Data to Coordinate Care and Support Community Re-Entry
Individuals with complex needs and patterns of high hospital utilization are often frequent users across multiple systems, including criminal justice and the homeless system. In order to better meet the needs of these individuals, communities are partnering with law enforcement agencies to use jail data, in conjunction with other data sets, to prevent unnecessary incarceration, provide necessary services and access to housing, and coordinate better care for clients as they re-enter society
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In the Thick of It  Victor Murray, Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers
In the Thick of It Kim Keaton, Corporation for Supportive Housing; Christina Sung, University of Chicago Center for Data Science and Public Policy

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Stakeholder Engagement – Executive Lounge
Community-Centered Design and Engagement for Development of Data Sharing Systems
People in need rarely need just one kind of help to stay healthy and navigating the complex landscape of services is difficult. This has led to the development of many tools, platforms, and software systems to help patients and providers manage referrals, but these solutions can in and of themselves create their own data and resource silos.  Learn how networks are partnering with others or evolving interoperable platforms in order to maximize connection points, reduce data silos, improve care coordination, and achieve better outcomes for their clients.
Getting Started Rita Deng and Chunfu Liu, Montgomery County Department of Health and Human Services
In the Thick of It  Susan Millea, Children’s Optimal Health; Rahel Berhane, Children’s Comprehensive Care Clinic

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Shallow dive sessions are an opportunity to hear from one initiative in greater detail and engage in discussions with the session leaders about their work, challenges, strategies, and lessons learned.

Statewide Data Collaboration – Capitol 1
A Mature Statewide Data Collaboration: Lessons Learned and Future Directions
The New Mexico Community Data Collaborative (NMCDC) is a unique, statewide data warehouse compiling demographic, socioeconomic, health and social determinant data at the neighborhood level. NMCDC has also established a training and learning network for citizen analysts which supports effective utilization of the collaborative resources. Learn about unique aspects of the collaboration which have contributed to its success, including: methods for sharing datasets between collaborators, permitting reuse of costly geocoded information; a consensus geographic analysis framework for communities; multi-factor health and risk indexes; and collaborative projects and products driven by consumer demand from advocacy organizations, health councils, and healthcare providers.
In the Thick of It Harvey Licht, New Mexico Community Data Collaborative; Susan Wilger, Southwest Center for Health Innovation

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Community Information Exchange – Capitol 2
Roadmap for Multi-Sector Collaboration to Improve Person-Centered Care Coordination
The Community Information Exchange (CIE), powered by 2-1-1 San Diego, is a collective movement and technology platform that shifts how health and social service providers deliver person-centered care. Through the CIE, a network of multi-disciplinary providers share and collaborate on an individual’s longitudinal record, community care plan and shared measures. This session will provide lessons learned from 2-1-1 San Diego’s Community Information Exchange, including primary components, such as infrastructure, technology, legal, partnership, and sustainability. This discussion will allow for a 2-1-1 led group discussion around building a roadmap to creating a CIE within participants’ own communities.
Getting Started Karis Grounds and William York, 2-1-1 San Diego / Community Information Exchange

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Community Data for CHNAs – Capitol 3
Collaborating on What Residents Care About
Trinity Health of New England’s Hartford, CT-based hospital, St. Francis, was an early adopter of including community data resources in their community health needs assessment (CHNA) by using the DataHaven Community Wellbeing Survey to gather information about resident experience. Learn how the speakers are working on integrating the CHNA process with their multi-sector North Hartford Triple Aim Collaborative to better understand and address community needs. Through data visualization and an interactive problem solving session, the discussion will connect participants to the new roles data can play in community outreach and population health improvement.
In the Thick of It Rick Brush, Wellville; Mary Stuart, Trinity Health/St. Francis

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Community-Centered Data to Inform Policy Capitol 4
Addressing Transportation Needs to Improve Racial Inequities in Infant Mortality

FLOURISH St. Louis’ goal is to eliminate racial disparities in infant mortality by 2033. The Transportation Action Team is a multi-stakeholder group with three arms: the data work group (evaluation and data analysis), the policy work group (local and statewide advocacy), and the FLOURISH Neighborhood Network (community engagement). Learn about the various tools and processes FLOURISH uses to collect data that complement Census data and other traditional population-level data from the state and discuss how to synthesize multi-stakeholder data to inform policy. The speakers will also share various challenges FLOURISH has encountered, especially regarding the delicate balance between data and authentic relationship building.

Getting Started Sarah Kennedy, Generate Health; Rhonda Bartow, City of St. Louis Health Department

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Social Needs and Risk Factors – Tabor
Healthcare-Based Social Needs Screening and Referral Tools and Technologies
In order to properly assess and address the social needs of patients, it is important to understand what kinds of data are being collected, where the data are, and how to use the data for improved care coordination and service delivery. Learn about the many different kinds of data related to social risk factors that are increasingly being collected in clinical settings (e.g., food insecurity, housing insecurity, transportation needs), how healthcare providers are using this information, and how other sectors might also benefit from this data. In addition, the session will provide an overview of social services referral technologies being developed for health care users and how organizations are utilizing services such as Aunt Bertha, Healthify, NowPow, and more.
Planning / Getting Started Caroline Fichtenberg, University of California, San Francisco / SIREN

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Universal Community Planning Tool – Cambridge
Universal Community Planning Tool for Community Engagement and Data Collection
A critical step in improving health in a community is to develop pathways for residents and partner organizations to contribute to the planning decisions that affect them. The Universal Community Planning Tool (UCPT), a digital commons developed by the Garrett County Health Department, provides a platform for continuous community engagement and a framework to collect hyper-local data that enables public health to measure the kind of impacts communities are making toward identified community health improvement strategies. Learn more about the UCPT as an open source project from its creators and hear how the Medina County Health Department is replicating the tool in their community.
Looking Forward Shelley Argabrite, Garrett County Health Department; Krista Wasowski, Medina County Health Department

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Neighborhood and Community Data – Executive Lounge
Using Neighborhood and Community Data to Promote Health
The National Neighborhood Indicators Partnership (NNIP) is a collaborative effort by the Urban Institute and local partners to further the development and use of neighborhood-level and community data in local policymaking and community building. Hear from two NNIP Partners who are working with local stakeholders to use data to promote health equity, guide decision-making, and better meet the needs of their residents. The speakers will share their experiences developing and growing an innovative online platform that shares compelling local data and community stories and applying a Basic Priority Rating method to facilitate collaborative decision-making processes around community health improvement planning.

• Leah Hendey, Urban Institute
In the Thick of It Karen Frederickson Comer, The Polis Center at Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI)
Planning Jennifer Newcomer, Shift Research Lab, The Piton Foundation

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2nd Floor Registration Area – Please take a quick break to refresh with a box lunch before Moving Upstream this afternoon.

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Capitol Ballroom
Moving Upstream: Challenges, Opportunities, and Moral Imperatives to Improve Health and Health Care
Please note: A live video stream of this plenary will also be available in Tabor.

Rishi Manchanda is a leading figure in upstream healthcare in the United States. He is the president and founder of Health Begins, a social network where clinicians can exchange ideas on prevention and upstream causes of illnesses. Rishi Manchanda is Chief Medical Officer of The Wonderful Company, a privately held $4 billion company committed to offering consumers high-quality, healthy brands. Previously, Rishi worked for the VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, where he was the lead physician for homeless primary care and for a network of community health centers in south Los Angeles, where he was the first director of social medicine and health equity. In 2008, Rishi founded RxDemocracy, a nonpartisan coalition that promotes civic engagement and voter registration in doctors’ offices and hospitals nationwide. In his 2013 TEDbook, The Upstream Doctors, Rishi introduced a new model of the healthcare workforce that includes “upstreamists” who improve social determinants of health. In this address, Dr. Manchanda updates us on the upstreamism.

• Dr. Rishi Manchanda, President and CEO, HealthBegins

Please note: BUILD Health Challenge guests will transition to a separate meeting during this time.

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Capitol Ballroom
Overcoming Policy Paralysis: Perspectives from the Field

Effectively sharing data requires a sound policy framework. Given the constraints at various levels, how are communities, states, and the federal government addressing policy challenges? What opportunities are there for alignment at these various levels? This session will include a broad discussion of what needs to happen in order to facilitate and accelerate data sharing as it relates to community health improvement.

Moderator: Sue Grinnell, Director, Public Health Innovation Lab, Public Health Institute
• Lauren Block, Program Director, Health Division, National Governors Association
• Dr. Darcy Phelan-Emrick, Chief Epidemiologist, Baltimore City Health Department

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Capitol Ballroom
Next Steps for Our Communities, All In, and the Field

Returning to the themes developed in the opening plenary, we will discuss and document our next steps together in communities across the country and with All In.

7 – Closing Plenary- Next Steps for our Communities, All In, and the Field from AllInData4Health on Vimeo.

We may have to leave, but we don’t have to say goodbye!  Continue the conversation with All In online and at future events.

Profiles of some collaborations and members are available on the All In online community (allin.healthdoers.org). If you would like to add a profile for your collaboration on the All In online community, please contact info@allindata.org.